A Baby-sized Baby Wolf Update!

My new Schacht Baby Wolf did finally arrive! It has taken me forever to actually set it up because when it arrived it came direct from the factory and smelled like raw lumber.

Lumber is a major migraine trigger for me and I really couldn’t get close enough to it to fully even unbox it. The only room it fits in is the living room so that has been challenging.

Someone told me that got wood smell out of a new dresser by filling the drawers with coffee beans. That’s not really an option with the loom so I instead filled a cotton produce bag with beans and hung it from the top beam. The smell started to go away pretty quickly but it took over a month to be faint enough I could actually handle it.

I never dreamed it would be so stinky! Even unfinished IKEA furniture doesn’t smell this strongly. I guess since it shipped here straight from the warehouse it never aired out?

The directions were pretty easy to follow. I do wish they were a little more detailed and gave some more reasoning behind what you are doing. One end of the heddles were red and greasy so I assumed that meant they went on top but I don’t know. They were on tiny thin threads and one set wasn’t connected so that was a little tedious to thread on. There does seem to be a tiny difference between the “front” and “back” of each heddle but all the directions was to slide them on the bar. The video they direct you to is 10 years old and the heddles are not packaged the same. The video for the apron rod they tell you to watch is for the Cricket rigid heddle. How hard is it to update the videos or film 5 minutes on one of the Wolf looms? I just wanted to make sure it didn’t matter which way you looped them on.

One of the fold knobs arrived really loose and fell off. In the directions they just tell you to be careful with them or the whole loom will collapse. Not how to reattach them. Let’s just say it involved using a key to hook the hole the screw was supposed to go in and some mild panic to hold it all together.

I think it comes with an extra apron rod? I have three. The packing slip included rubber o-rings but there weren’t any in the box and I never found instructions that included them so I’m going to assume they weren’t actually needed. They said discard some from the jack pins so maybe they were supposed to replace them if you wanted to secure it again for transport? Or something? I don’t see anywhere on the loom they’d go.

I’m excited to finally get weaving! It really has been a more stressful and drawn out process than I’d expect. It does still smell a little bit it’s manageable.

Getting Started in Rigid Heddle Weaving: Loom & Stand Assembly

As you know from my last post I got a Kromski Harp Forte Rigid Heddle Loom (and stand and overpriced bag) that does not need to be finished. Other looms by other brands nine times out of ten are bizarrely sold unfinished so make sure you do that before you do anything else. I can only imagine how grimy highly handled wood beams get if they are left unfinished. You do need a Phillips head screwdriver to assemble the loom. We set up on the floor because we don’t have a table big enough to lay all the pieces out on.

I was mostly thrilled with the unboxing and set up of my loom. It came in a fairly narrow long box. The loom is pretty light weight so I was able to manage that (and the larger box with extra heddles, the stand and the overpriced bag) by myself. Jammed in the box with the parts was a bunch of Polish Lidl ads which was interesting to look at and a thrifty eco friendly way to keep things from shifting during it’s long journey from Poland to Kentucky and then to Baltimore.

The loom box was marked “Kromski Harp” not “Harp Forte” which is the “newer” version (from what I can tell, the Forte came out a few years ago) which gave me a brief moment of panic but the gears were metal and not plastic which is the difference between the “Harp” and the “Harp Forte”.

The directions also note that it came with the double heddle block vs the single heddle block which until very recently were standard. Double heddle blocks hold two heddles and allow for more complex weaving and sold separately are about $40 so that was a nice surprise.

The directions were mostly clear–I would lay out all the parts to make sure they are there and ready to go–some of the screws look very similar at first glance. While the cover of the directions mentioned the heddle block upgrade it did not mention any changes of where to attach it, which seemed important. There are two notches it could go in and we just had to guess what made the most sense. I’m not sure why they didn’t redo the instructions to make it more clear.

The rope part to attach the wooden dowels you need is a little odd but apparently a streamlined version than their older instructions which involved you cutting the rope and burning the ends with a candle. You don’t have to do this any more, it is one continuous thin rope. I used what came with it but I’ve heard of people upgrading to Texsolv Loom Cord which is something to keep in mind for the future.

It took us a little over an hour to put the loom together. Hopefully we did not mix up the back and front with the directions warned was a “fatal error”. The wooden parts were lightly marked. One person probably could assemble it alone but it was nice to have a second pair of hands to help hold things still.

The loom comes with warping pegs (the bottom of the loom can double as a warping board to prepare your yarn for indirect warping) and clamps to do direct warping but absolutely no instructions on how to warp your loom or any ideas of what other materials you might need to get started (namely kraft paper or warping sticks) or first project ideas. None at all.

The directions for the stand were stapled backwards which was confusing at first. It comes with a hex key/Allen wrench/Allen key for assembly. The screws are very similar in size and appearance and we had to make a last minute switch out. The stand screws into your loom so you need to have that assembled first. I do wonder if you can put a third heddle in the loom with the frame attached. It doesn’t mention it on the loom or stand instructions but in looking at it (and conformed by a review on the Woolery site by Lianna F) it doesn’t appear to allow it. This is a little strange because if you have the 32 inch loom you basically need a stand and there are three heddle patterns out there.

The stand instructions were not great. Do able but the pictures were not very detailed especially when contrasted with the better instructions for the loom.

Our pughuahua was very interested but no help.